White chocolate pomegranate bark

By | September 21, 2014

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Okay, everyone. Three more days to Rosh Hashanah! Freezer filled? Good for you. Haven’t started cooking? It’s alright, your family will forgive you (or at least they really should, with Yom Kippur coming up). Anyway, it’s pretty much crunch time so I figured we should chomp down on some bark together.

In the course of my strenuous research on chocolate bark, I learned that there are generally two types. The first method involves mixing some things into the chocolate, and the second has you only sprinkle those things on top of the chocolate. Neither kind really satisfies me. With the first, you have the mix-ins nicely distributed, but the overall effect isn’t as pretty, and with the second, the bark is really pretty but it ends up feeling like some stuff sprinkled on chocolate instead of an actual recipe.

My take is a combination of the two, and I think I got the best of both worlds. The chocolate is mixed with crispy rice cereal (totally feels like a Krackel bar!) and then topped with sweet, tart pomegranate arils and candied ginger for an elegant punch of flavor. The result is an easy and gorgeous Rosh Hashanah dessert that you can throw together in minutes. Who’s in?

And that’s it from me until after Rosh Hashanah! In the last month, we’ve done sweet challah topping, cabbage salad and tomato salad, two soups, a grain side dish, and an awesome dairy kugel. I hope those recipes have helped with your prep for the chag. For more cooking inspiration, check out my roundup of 30 dishes to freeze for Rosh Hashanah and my family’s yom tov menu plan.

K’tiva v’chatima tova to all of my readers! Wishing you a year of only good things (and I’m thinking of so many of you individually as I say that). Be back soon with recipes for pre/post Yom Kippur and Succos!

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something — anything — on Amazon through these links, a (very) small portion of your purchase helps support More Quiche, Please. Thank you!

Honey balsamic tomato salad

By | September 18, 2014

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Remember the new series I told you about last week, where a group of bloggers and writers talk about the life of an Orthodox woman? Today’s topic is making and spending Shabbos with young children. Come have a read! (If you missed the first post, you can catch up here.)

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With seven yom tov meals coming up (Shabbos included there), I’m a big believer in the little recipes. You know what I mean, right? Not the soups or mains or desserts, but the small, quick dishes that are fresh, simple, and very much fuss-free. This honey balsamic tomato salad is definitely in that category. Meaning, you can make it in like 5 minutes. Even if your guests have already showed up.

Honey balsamic tomato salad can give new life to a meal populated by leftovers, which I think is kind of inevitable with so many holiday meals in a row. Or if you’re one of those people who make big spreads of salatim as a first course, this would be a great inclusion. Need a side dish instead? Just mix these ingredients right into your leftover bulgar, rice, or couscous. Works like a charm.

Apple pomegranate noodle kugel (Plus: September Kosher Connection linkup!)

By | September 15, 2014

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Craisins are generally something I save for salads. Just a small handful, and a totally ordinary bowl of lettuce and cut-up veggies becomes special. A few weeks ago, I noticed pomegranate juice craisins in my makolet (of all places) and grabbed a bag immediately. These things are so addictive — all tart and sweet and chewy — that I decided they deserved a recipe created just for them.

Sweet noodle kugel (aka lukshen kugel) is one of those traditional dishes that everyone’s bubbe loves to make. My version is different from most in a few ways: (1) less sugar, (2) an amazing crunchy brown-butter cornflake topping, and (3) grated apples and pomegranate craisins to dress it up for Rosh Hashanah.

If your yom tov table is ready for tradition with a twist, this kugel is calling. And come back soon — I’ve got more great Rosh Hashanah recipes waiting for you!

Prefer a savory noodle kugel? Try my dairy noodle kugel with mushrooms and roasted garlic.


This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something — anything — on Amazon through these links, a (very) small portion of your purchase helps support More Quiche, Please. Thank you!

Rosh Hashanah menu 2014

By | September 14, 2014

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Last Rosh Hashanah, there was just too much food. I didn’t think such a thing was possible, but I guess you live and learn, and boy did I learn. It was a lesson that snuck its way into our Shabbos planning, too — for the last seven months, we’ve been making and eating simpler Shabbos meals and we’re much better off for it.

So this time, my Rosh Hashanah menu is not a big grand thing. The night meals are challah and cream cheese (= easiest possible dip), simanim, soup, and dessert. Same dessert, but different soups because that’s fun for me. The day meals have a bit more going on, but none of those dishes are complicated and I do have some repeats. Also, major concession on my part: When our guests asked what they could bring, I took something real off my list and asked them to take care of dessert. Highly recommended plan of action.

For more menu inspiration, check out my Rosh Hashanah menus from 2013, 2012, and 2011. And scroll down for a look at my cooking plan!

Tali’s Official RH Cooking Plan

Week of Aug. 31: Carrot ginger soup, vanilla bean ice cream, and a triple batch of round challahs with sweet topping

Week of Sep. 7: Beet soup and upside-down apple cake

Week of Sep. 14: Cream of mushroom soup and broccoli quiche

Tuesday, Sep. 23: Cream cheese, double batch of lemon chummus, and double batch of turkish salad

Wednesday, Sep. 24 (erev RH): Simanim, quadrouple batch of green beans, sesame noodles, salmon, and lentil rice pilaf

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something — anything — on Amazon through these links, a (very) small portion of your purchase helps support More Quiche, Please. Thank you!