Savory tuna crepes with mushrooms & mozzarella

By | January 3, 2013

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This recipe first appeared in the Aug. 27, 2012 edition of “From Tali’s Kitchen,” my biweekly cooking column in Binah magazine.

I shouldn’t say this, but I’m going to say it anyway: These crepes are one of the best things I’ve ever made. I shouldn’t say it because it sounds so cliche. Also because it’s not the first time I’ve raved about a dish, and it won’t be the last. But I’m serious. There’s just something about these crepes!

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Are you afraid of making crepes? Sounds too fancy? Too time-consuming? I’m telling you, it’s really, really not like that. There’s nothing even remotely fancy in this ingredient list, and they cook up in just seconds in the pan. Plus, as long as you use a nonstick skillet, they’ll be easy to flip.

Really, the only good excuse you could have for not making crepes is that you have a squiggly little infant on your hands. I would totally be making these right now, but yeah. That’s my excuse! (It’s okay, he’s worth it.)

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So where were we? Right, crepes being easy. You grab a cooled crepe, plop a few spoonfuls of sauteed mushrooms, mozzarella, and tuna in the middle, and fold the left side in toward the center. Then down goes the top and up goes the bottom.

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Then roll the whole thing to the right, and you’ll have yourself a nice fat crepe. Fat is good! You want fat crepes. It means they’re full of delicious things.

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With these crepes, though, it’s not only the inside that’s delicious. I added minced garlic and a sprinkle of thyme to the crepe batter, and they ratchet up the flavor significantly. No boring crepes around here, let me tell you.

Once they’re filled, the only thing left to do is get them back in the pan for a few minutes to sizzle in browning butter. It’s the best-possible send-off, and since these are dairy anyway, there’s no reason to skip the butter.

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Please. Promise me you won’t skip the butter. See those crispy, buttery, browned tops? You want those.

Oh, and you also want some sour cream and sauteed mushrooms and extra thyme for the topping. Don’t forget it.

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One year ago: Lace cookies


10 Comments

Abigail on January 3, 2013 at 11:35 am.

Can I have one now please without the mushrooms?? Look so good!

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stephanie/the kosher foodies on January 3, 2013 at 4:39 pm.

these are so pretty! i’ve always been scared of making crepes, but crepe cake is on my 2013 to-do list!

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Tali Simon on January 3, 2013 at 5:14 pm.

Crepe cake is on my list, too. Race you!

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jessica (the kosher foodies) on January 4, 2013 at 4:59 am.

beautiful! i’ve never made crepes before. what an interesting way to serve them.

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me on January 5, 2013 at 2:55 pm.

that sounds wonderfully easy. i usually make crepes with a spinach or mushroom filling, but tuna and cheese sounds great. will try out those! with a little extra tomato, maybe? or italian herbs in the batter? or…?

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Tali Simon on January 6, 2013 at 3:48 pm.

You got it — these are totally adaptable.

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Dena on January 26, 2014 at 2:51 pm.

Hi Tali -do I have to fry them when done can I bake them? Also do you have a replacement for a cream like sauce for the tuna because Sephardim don’t eat dairy with fish so I can’t use cheese.

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Tali Simon on January 26, 2014 at 4:49 pm.

The pan-fry is to add color, give them a crispy finish, melt the cheese, and heat everything through (of course, the butter flavor is nice, too). If you don’t care much about the color and crispy finish, you can definitely heat them in the oven.

As far as the fillings, I would just use a little more tuna and mushrooms (skipping the cheese), or use a little more cheese and mushrooms (skipping the tuna). The thing to watch out for in a cheeseless crepe is trouble holding together, so if you have things like pareve sour cream or cream cheese available, you could try that, though I can’t vouch for them personally. Good luck!

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Dena on February 16, 2014 at 10:17 am.

One more question, how does the crepe remain sealed if it is baked and not fried? Do I need to brush something on it before baking?

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Tali Simon on February 16, 2014 at 11:10 am.

You’re right, it might not seal as well, but I don’t think that’s necessarily a problem. These aren’t finger food anyway, so I would just bake them seam-side down and serve them the same way. You’ll at least have the weight of the fillings keeping them closed.

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