Apple pomegranate noodle kugel (Plus: September Kosher Connection linkup!)

By | September 15, 2014

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Craisins are generally something I save for salads. Just a small handful, and a totally ordinary bowl of lettuce and cut-up veggies becomes special. A few weeks ago, I noticed pomegranate juice craisins in my makolet (of all places) and grabbed a bag immediately. These things are so addictive — all tart and sweet and chewy — that I decided they deserved a recipe created just for them.

Sweet noodle kugel (aka lukshen kugel) is one of those traditional dishes that everyone’s bubbe loves to make. My version is different from most in a few ways: (1) less sugar, (2) an amazing crunchy brown-butter cornflake topping, and (3) grated apples and pomegranate craisins to dress it up for Rosh Hashanah.

If your yom tov table is ready for tradition with a twist, this kugel is calling. And come back soon — I’ve got more great Rosh Hashanah recipes waiting for you!

Prefer a savory noodle kugel? Try my dairy noodle kugel with mushrooms and roasted garlic.


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Rosh Hashanah menu 2014

By | September 14, 2014

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Last Rosh Hashanah, there was just too much food. I didn’t think such a thing was possible, but I guess you live and learn, and boy did I learn. It was a lesson that snuck its way into our Shabbos planning, too — for the last seven months, we’ve been making and eating simpler Shabbos meals and we’re much better off for it.

So this time, my Rosh Hashanah menu is not a big grand thing. The night meals are challah and cream cheese (= easiest possible dip), simanim, soup, and dessert. Same dessert, but different soups because that’s fun for me. The day meals have a bit more going on, but none of those dishes are complicated and I do have some repeats. Also, major concession on my part: When our guests asked what they could bring, I took something real off my list and asked them to take care of dessert. Highly recommended plan of action.

For more menu inspiration, check out my Rosh Hashanah menus from 2013, 2012, and 2011. And scroll down for a look at my cooking plan!

Tali’s Official RH Cooking Plan

Week of Aug. 31: Carrot ginger soup, vanilla bean ice cream, and a triple batch of round challahs with sweet topping

Week of Sep. 7: Beet soup and upside-down apple cake

Week of Sep. 14: Cream of mushroom soup and broccoli quiche

Tuesday, Sep. 23: Cream cheese, double batch of lemon chummus, and double batch of turkish salad

Wednesday, Sep. 24 (erev RH): Simanim, quadrouple batch of green beans, sesame noodles, salmon, and lentil rice pilaf

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something — anything — on Amazon through these links, a (very) small portion of your purchase helps support More Quiche, Please. Thank you!

Cheesy zucchini 3-grain pilaf

By | September 11, 2014

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First, something new: I’m participating in a series of blog posts called Orthodox Women Talk, where a group of bloggers/writers talk about — you guessed it — what it’s like to be an Orthodox woman. The first topic is how we handle long davenings, so come see what everyone has to say

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There are two kinds of people: the ones who take advantage of cooking on yom tov, and the ones who don’t. I don’t. Never have, and so very uninterested in starting. (If you’re not sure what I’m talking about, Chabad has lots of information on the topic.) As much as I love cooking, a yom tov spent in front of the stove would not be at all conducive to a slow-paced, quality-time-with-the-family kind of day.

But I know people who make their entire lunchtime seudah on yom tov morning (are you one of them?), and part of me does understand it. The food is fresh, there’s no reheating, and maybe you have a long morning to work with before people show up for lunch. On Rosh Hashanah, you likely have the longest morning of the year if you aren’t in shul. But then again, if you aren’t in shul, you’re probably home with little kids, and that long luxurious morning doesn’t exist.

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Cheesy zucchini 3-grain pilaf is an equal opportunity side dish. Making a dairy meal for Rosh Hashanah? Here’s something that rounds out your meal and can be made on the stove (just shred the zucchini ahead of time). If cooking on yom tov isn’t your thing, you can serve this with dinner any old night of the week. Either way, it’s a delicious change of pace from your standard bowl of rice: more texture, great flavor, totally satisfying.

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something — anything — on Amazon through these links, a (very) small portion of your purchase helps support More Quiche, Please. Thank you!

Soup with the Simons: Easy beet soup

By | September 9, 2014

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This will be the fourth Rosh Hashanah since we got married, and our third time doing the simanim at home. Both of the other times, we did them as a round of appetizers, though it feels kind of wrong to call them that. Ironically, I can’t remember whether we ever did the fish head. I’m pretty sure we had one last year, and I’m pretty sure my husband took a tiny symbolic taste while I just tried to hold my breath. But I could also be making all of this up. You’d think I’d remember something like a fish head, but no. Oh well.

I know a lot of families — maybe yours, too? — incorporate the simanim into the meal itself. Things like carrots, beets, squash, leeks, and pomegranates lend themselves to plenty of dishes, so you can have a lot of fun designing your meal to fit the simanim. This soup is a great way to get the beets in, and with its crazy magenta color, it’s also positively stunning.

More ways to include beets in your Rosh Hashanah meals:

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something — anything — on Amazon through these links, a (very) small portion of your purchase helps support More Quiche, Please. Thank you!